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One-Armed Bandit

A couple of weeks ago, I talked about one-handed Seoinage. Ever since then I have playing with both one-handed throws and entries. I have had mixed success. Last week I threw someone with a one-handed Eri-Seoinage, and yesterday, I almost threw someone with a one-handed Morote Seoinage.

Essentially, this love for the one-handed teachniques is borne out of the inability to get a second-hand grip against Ukes who love to grip-fight. The scenario basically plays out as follows - at Hajime, I walk to Uke and look to get a right hand grip. Uke does his best at preventing me to get that grip, so I go lefty - grabbing his right lapel. At this point, he's confused - partially, I am sure because he doesn't play lefty enough to understand what I might be trying to do. So they stiff-arm, trying to keep me at bay, and making it very difficult for me to grab at their left sleeve. I used to have a hard time figuring out what to do, but then I tried the one-handed grip.

Essentially, when I get my left-hand grip on his right lapel, I try to circle him around so I am almost parallel with him, as he tries to square-up with me, I give a little tug towards me on his lapel. If the timing is right, he will need to take a step slightly forward to adjust his balance, and that is when I strike. I quickly take advantage of the Kuzushi by darting in across his front and pouncing with left-handed Tai-Otoshi/Seoi-Otoshi/Yama-Arashi. Seoinage is almost there, but I am not getting in far enough to load Uke onto my back. I guess I will need to practice it more.

I am also thinking about what to do when circling the other way - Sode Tsurikomi Goshi needs work, and I could probably use a Ko-Uchi Gari/Ko-Uchi Makikomi too.

I'll keep you posted. I just hope my potential victims, err.. ukes don't read this blog :)

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